Lectures, Workshops & More  
E-newsletter Facebook Twitter

Lectures, films, workshops, and gallery talks for adults provide insight into our permanent collections and special exhibitions.


Adult programs
 
  • Lectures by visiting scholars, local experts and curatorial staff offer insight into the exhibitions and permanent collections of our museums.
  • Films are selected to complement special exhibitions and are guaranteed to send you back into the galleries afterwards to see things a bit differently.
  • Programs that explore h istorical, social and cultural topics related to the Gilded Age take place in our intimate auditorium or through more casual events in the galleries or Education Center.

  • Free programs create interesting ways to enhance an exhibition while our studio workshops provide a creative outlet for artist and beginner alike.

Through August 2

   

Docent Tours of Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills:
The British Passion for Landscape

Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays at 2:00 p.m.
Meet in The Frick Art Museum rotunda

Docent-led tours of Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape are free with exhibition admission.

Groups of five or more are requested to schedule a private tour at an alternate time. Group tours are $5 per person and must be scheduled one to two weeks in advance, at 412-371-0600.



Friday Features Gallery Talks
Fridays hrough July 31
1:00 p.m.
The Frick Art Museum

On Fridays during the exhibition, Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape, meet Frick curators and educators in the galleries for free talks exploring the works, artists and themes in the exhibition. Programs focus on a different aspect of the exhibition each week.

Free with exhibition admission; open to the public.


   

Exhibition Lecture:
Pastures Green and Dark Satanic Mills

Friday, June 19
7:00 p.m.
The Frick Art Museum

Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art,
Yale University, Curator of the exhibition. 


Join the curator of Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills for a special summer evening lecture at the Frick. Barringer offers an in-depth look at the exhibition as a whole while exploring its key themes. 

$10 members; $12 non-members and guests. Advance registration and pre-payment required.
Call 412-371-0600.


Gallery Book Program: How Green Was My Valley
Thursday, July 16
1:30-3:00 p.m.
Meet in The Frick Art Museum Rotunda

The lush landscapes and industrial scenes of the Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills exhibition are the backdrop for a discussion of How Green Was My Valley, the classic 1939 novel by Richard Llewellyn set in South Wales.  Led by Frick educators, this program connects the story of the novel and the stunning artwork in a unique gallery experience.

$8 members; $10 non-members and guests. Advance registration and pre-payment required. Exhibition admission included.
Call 412-371-0600.



Film at Noon: Manufactured Landscapes
Wednesday, July 22
12:00 p.m.
The Frick Art Museum  

Present-day industrial landscapes are the focus of this striking documentary on the work of artist Edward Burtynsky. Acclaimed for his large-scale photographs of “manufactured landscapes”—quarries, recycling yards, factories, mines and dams—Burtynsky creates art from civilization’s materials and debris. The film follows him through China, as he shoots the evidence and effects of that country’s massive industrial revolution. Filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal further extends the narratives of Burtynsky’s photographs, allowing us to meditate on our impact on the planet and witness both the epicenters of industrial endeavor and the dumping grounds of its waste. Not rated. 90 minutes, 2006.

Free and open to the public.



Act 48 Teacher Workshop:
Myth and Memory—The Rural-Urban Divide

Tuesday, July 28
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
The Frick Art Museum, Lexington Education Center

Worth five Act 48 activity hours, this daylong workshop delves into eco-criticism to investigate the ways in which cultural attitudes about wilderness and civilization have changed over time, how they’ve stayed the same, and what they can tell us about ourselves. Cultural criticism from authors like Raymond Williams, who wrote the influential text, The Country and the City, informs standards-based activities in The Frick Art Museum—utilizing the exhibition, Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape—and across the site. “A contrast between country and city, as fundamental ways of life, reaches back into classical times,” Williams says, and it is “a myth functioning as a memory.”

$12 teacher members; $16 non-members and guests. Advance registration and pre-payment required.
Call 412-371-0600.


Closing Weekend Celebration: Mr. Turner

Friday, July 31

7:00 p.m.

The Frick Art Museum

Join us during the closing weekend of Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape for Mike Leigh’s Oscar-nominated 2014 film (Production Design, Cinematography, Costume Design, Original Score), which explores the last quarter century of the life of celebrated and eccentric British painter J.M.W Turner (1775-1851). The film stars Timothy Spall, who won Best Actor for the role at the Cannes Film Festival. Rated R. 150 minutes, 2014. Free and open to the public.



Act 48 Teacher Workshop: Counting on History

Tuesday, August 11

10:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Clayton, Lexington Education Center

Elementary and upper level math and history teachers can gain insight into ways in which buildings, objects, and other tactile tools serve as unique vehicles for teaching history and mathematics concepts. Basing its approach on a successful school program model, this innovative workshop, worth five Act 48 activity hours, guides teachers in learning new ways of making math and history come alive for their students. Participants use reasoning, measurement, and computation to solve a series of practical problems based on real events at Clayton more than a century ago. A lively tour of Clayton, the examination of primary sources and the use of manipulatives, both new and historic, offer educators ways to model how math can be used to study history as well as the economics of everyday life. $12 teacher members; $16 non-members and guests. Boxed lunch provided. Advance registration and pre-payment required.


Coffee and Culture:
A Middle Class Home in the Gilded Age

Tuesday, September 15

10:00–11:00 a.m.

Lexington Education Center

Jan Shoop and Joan Stewart, Kerr Memorial Museum, Oakmont


While Clayton reveals how an upper class family lived during the Gilded Age in Pittsburgh, the Kerr Memorial Museum opens the door to middle class life during the same period. Through images, artifacts, and clothing, learn about life in the charming Queen Anne style Oakmont home of Dr. Thomas R. Kerr and his family, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Now a museum, the home brings to life the story of middle class life from the 1890s to 1910. $10 members; $12 non-members and guests. Advance registration and pre-payment required.